FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

The following questions and answers are those that are most frequently asked by consumers who call us for medical and/or nutrition related information about Truvia® natural sweetener.

Section 1 – Diabetes and blood sugar/glycemic index

Truvia® natural sweetener is safe and appropriate for use by people with diabetes. Truvia® stevia leaf extract and erythritol have both been studied in short and long term clinical studies to evaluate safety for use by people with diabetes. Truvia® natural sweetener has no impact on blood glucose or insulin. The product label declares 3 grams of carbohydrate. This carbohydrate is erythritol (a sugar alcohol) which is used as the carrier for intensely sweet stevia. Erythritol cannot be used by the body to create glucose and it cannot be converted to energy (calories). The body removes erythritol without metabolizing it. Therefore, the product label lists 3 grams of carbohydrate (because of FDA labeling regulations) but a person who is closely monitoring carbohydrate intake should not count these grams of carbohydrate. Click here to learn more about erythritol.
Can people with diabetes use this product?
No. The components in Truvia® natural sweetener have been studied in humans, including people with diabetes, and they do not have any impact on blood glucose or insulin levels.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener impact blood sugar?
Truvia® natural sweetener does not contain usable carbohydrates. If you are closely counting the number of grams of carbohydrates in your diet, you should not count the grams of carbohydrate that appear on the label of the Truvia® natural sweetener. Truvia® natural sweetener has no impact on blood glucose or insulin. The product label declares 3 grams of carbohydrate. This carbohydrate is erythritol (a sugar alcohol) which is used as the carrier for intensely sweet stevia. Erythritol cannot be used by the body to create glucose and it cannot be converted to energy (calories). The body removes erythritol without metabolizing it. Therefore, the product label lists 3 grams of carbohydrate (because of FDA labeling regulations) but a person who is closely monitoring carbohydrate intake should not count these grams of carbohydrate.
Does the product contain carbohydrates?

Section 2 – Drug interactions and nutrition information

There are no known interactions between Truvia® natural sweetener and any prescription or over the counter medications. There haven’t been any targeted safety studies to evaluate the potential for interactions, so we always recommend that consumers ask their prescribing physician if they have any questions about the potential for a drug interaction.
Are there any known drug interactions?
No, Truvia® natural sweetener does not contain vitamin K. This is important to people who take blood thinners, such as Coumadin, because they must closely monitor the vitamin K content of their diets.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener contain vitamin K?
Truvia® natural sweetener does not contain appreciable potassium and would be considered a low potassium food. It is possible for there to be trace amounts of potassium in Truvia® natural sweetener, but this amount would not exceed .02 mg per sachet.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener contain potassium?
No, Truvia® natural sweetener does not contain grapefruit.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener contain grapefruit?

Section 3 – Gastrointestinal concerns and issues

Any food or drink can cause an upset stomach. There is nothing special about Truvia® natural sweetener that makes it more or less likely than any other food to cause adverse gastrointestinal symptoms. Any food, particularly if one consumes too much, can result in adverse symptoms. Concerns about gas, bloating, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting should be addressed with a qualified health professional.
Can Truvia® natural sweetener cause upset stomach?
Yes, it’s possible but not likely. Click here to read about Diarrhea (laxation) and Truvia® natural sweetener
Can Truvia® natural sweetener cause diarrhea if one consumes too much?
No, Truvia® natural sweetener is a gluten free food.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener contain gluten?
Yes. Truvia® natural sweetener is safe for all individuals. Uncommonly, a very small number of individuals complain that erythritol, the sugar alcohol that it is used as a bulking agent with the stevia, may result in discomfort.

IBS is an uncomfortable, but non-progressing and non-damaging, chronic disorder. It affects nearly 1 in 5 people, making it common enough to be confused with other dietary causes of abdominal discomfort. With IBS, some individuals have stomach aches, bloating, gassiness and cramping associated with diarrhea, constipation, or both.

The first line of therapy is dietary change and stress reduction. Certain dietary items often seem to cause symptoms, such as the consumption of large meals, carbonated beverages or ingestion of caffeinated products, such as coffee, soda or energy drinks. Stress, depression or anxiety frequently can trigger symptoms, as well. So, individuals should avoid their own personal problem foods or beverages. Additionally, they should practice stress reduction measures, such as good sleep habits, regular exercise, relaxation techniques and, in certain cases, medications.

Based on a wide array of clinical studies, nearly everyone will be able to use Truvia® natural sweetener in their diet with no problems. For those occasional individuals with repeated symptoms after consuming the product, trying a lower dose or using Truvia® natural sweetener only with a meal or snack may help. For those few who are extremely sensitive, avoiding use of Truvia® natural sweetener will be the best way to avoid discomfort.
Is Truvia® natural sweetener safe for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

Section 4 – General Questions

Pregnant and nursing women can safely use Truvia® natural sweetener. Safety studies published in the peer reviewed scientific journal, Food and Chemical Toxicology, found Truvia® stevia leaf extract to be safe with no negative effects on general health, reproduction, fertility, growth or development of offspring. Your healthcare professional will advise you on the best diet during pregnancy and lactation.
Is Truvia® natural sweetener safe for pregnant and nursing women?
The ADI is equivalent to about 29 packets daily. This is less than the daily consumption selected for clinical studies.
What is the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for Truvia® natural sweetener?
Yes, Truvia® natural sweetener is gluten-free.
Is Truvia® natural sweetener gluten-free?
Erythritol is the largest ingredient in Truvia® natural sweetener by weight, and is used as an ingredient to provide bulk and the sugar-like crystalline appearance and texture for Truvia® natural sweetener. The erythritol used in Truvia® natural sweetener is produced through a natural fermentation process. Fermentation is the process by which an organism metabolizes or “digests” one or more food sources to produce a desired product. Fermentation occurs naturally in a variety of different foods given the right conditions and is used to produce wine, beer and yogurt. In the case of erythritol, a natural yeast, Moniliella pollinis, digests a simple sugar called dextrose and other nutrients and produces erythritol. After fermentation, the erythritol is filtered and dried into crystals. Erythritol is found naturally in a variety of fruits, such as grapes and pears, as well as in mushrooms, and certain fermented foods such as soy sauce and wine.
What is erythritol and why does Truvia® contain erythritol?
No. Truvia® natural sweetener is not GMO, and does not contain any genetically modified ingredients.

There are no known varieties of genetically modified stevia available anywhere in the world. The carrier for the intensely sweet stevia leaf extract is called erythritol. As described above, the erythritol used in Truvia® natural sweetener is produced by a yeast organism that is found in nature. The yeast ferments or digests dextrose and other nutrients. In other words, dextrose is the food for the yeast – much like corn may be food for a cow that produces meat or milk. The dextrose used as the feedstock for the yeast is a simple sugar that is derived from the starch component of U.S.-grown corn. Although genetically enhanced corn and non-transgenic corn are grown in the U.S. today, erythritol is not made from corn or dextrose feedstock (just as milk is not made from cattle feed); it is made from the yeast organism. Erythritol is not genetically modified, and does not contain any genetically modified proteins.
Does Truvia® natural sweetener contain GMO? Is it genetically modified?